Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Burda 10-2007-119, Frilled With My New Coat

Burda 10-2007-119 Thumbnail

I have loved Burda 10-2007-119 ever since it came out in the magazine. Love the shoulder princess lines and the vaguely military appeal. At the time, though, I wasn't confident in my skills to think I could make a coat. Discovering Pattern Review and blogging has really helped me to grow! I changed the style to single breasted and eliminated that decorative seam in the front panel.

The outer fabric is a wool herringbone from The Carol Collection that I had block fused in New York on LindsayT's recommendation. What a luxury! It was awesome to just cut into this fabric and sew it up without a couple hours of fusing in there.

Tie Silk Lining I lined it with tie silk from FabricMart, in 2008 Cidell and I split two 10 yard bundles ($20/bundle). I have used it previously in an obi, as lining for a hat, and to make wine gift bags. I think it is fantastic for coat lining because it is stable and sturdy, and silk is so warm and luxurious. I had to use two different fabrics because there wasn't enough of either. I had enough of the paisley-ish (used as trim in this blouse) for the body, and used the striped for the sleeves. They coordinate well enough, and I brought the stripe in more with a big pocket in the lining. The buttons are also FabricMart, from a 4 pound bag.

Interlining Neck Attachment The coat is interlined with a wool/silk/cotton from my Fabric.com Vera Wang $1.99/yd binge last January. I have to say, though I bought too much of that fabric (probably), I have sewn up a surprising amount of it. I'm not quite up to half, but I have certainly sewn down a quarter of it--and considering I started with 46 yards, that's not nothing. I was hoping to make a skirt with the rest of the interlining fabric, but working with it confirmed that it is just too wrinkly for clothes. Great for interlining, though.

I started this project by serger-constructing the interlining. I did not get off to a propitious start as the first seam off the machine was the center back seam--except that there was one large shoulder in the middle of my neck. Hmmm. The downside of a shoulder princess garment is that it's not instantly obvious which is the center back and which is the side back seam. However, not having to ease those seams as in an armscye princess is worth momentary confusion and dumb moves.

The trim is the only pricey thing about this coat. At $12/yd from Fabric.com, the cotton velveteen is an expensive fabric by my standards. But I had a vision in my head and if $12/yd fabric is what it took I would pay $12/yd.

I had about six inches over two yards of the herringbone. The coat is drafted to below-knee length (on a petite, or should I say alleged petite given Burda's ersatz petite-ing). I wanted a mid-thigh coat so I shortened the length 4 inches. This turned out highly fortuitous as I had exactly the right amount of fabric--we're talking about one extra inch of fabric. I actually managed to make a coat with a self-faced front! I like the contrast facing (as seen here and here), but in this case I didn't want to do it. I definitely did not want velveteen as the facing since it would pick up lint, stick to my clothes, and start looking shabby before the rest of the coat, but I didn't want to introduce a third fabric, either. Relief!

As previously discussed, my new technique for this coat was bound buttonholes. I will say no more about that trauma. The other new thing I tried was topstitching. I had been admiring the topstitched seams on the RTW coats hanging on the coat rack at the gym (love this surreptitious opportunity to look at all different coats). I thought that to get the dimensional effect you had to do a welted seam or something, but I figured I'd just give normal topstitching a try. It worked! That great look is not complicated at all!

Pocket Reinforcement

As usual, I reinforced the pocket seamline with ribbon to keep the pocket line from stretching out. When it is cold, I generally walk with my hands in my pockets for extra warmth. I was not thinking when I sewed the pockets and sewed them with a normal 1/2" seam instead of a slightly smaller seam allowance to roll them toward the inside. I used the tie silk as the front half of the pocket to reduce bulk, so it's lucky that I decided to ruffle the pocket opening as it hides that contrast fabric. Here's a view of the completed pocket.

Fleece Lined Pockets

For even more warmth in the pockets, I lined them with fleece. I cut out fleece pieces based on the pocket pattern, cut off the opening edge seam allowance, and sewed them outside the seamline to the pocket seam allowances. I placed the fleece on the front of the pocket for an extra layer of wind blocking.

Invisibly Hand Stitch Interlining I separately constructed the outer shell, lining, and interlining. The interlining was cut to match the lining with its center back ease pleat. To put them together, I lined up the lining and interlining at the neckline edge, pleated them together for the CB ease pleat, and stitched as one to the inner collar, as seen above. I hand tacked the interlining to the lining at the shoulder and underarms as well to keep it from shifting, and sewed the interlining and lining as one at the sleeve hem. I trimmed the interlining an inch above the lower hem and it hangs free inside the coat. I extended the interlining all the way to the front opening edge on the left side and sewed the buttons through the outer fabric, interlining, and facing to secure. For the right front opening edge with the buttonholes, I trimmed the interlining a couple inches short of the edge and then invisibly hand-stitched the interlining to the facing to keep it from shifting around.

Hand Gather Ruffle My original plan was to serger gather the ruffles. I adjust the differential settings as high as they go and...nothing. Absolutely no effect on the velveteen. OK, fine, I'll just use the sewing machine to run a basting stitch. Um, no. The velveteen was way too thick for that the work. So I had to gather all the ruffles by hand. I thought it would take forever, but it actually only took the length of Legally Blonde. I didn't bother to locate my thimble until I was almost done, and my fingers were pretty sore. I don't think I pricked myself, though.

I was pretty proud of myself on the cuff frills. I actually had to calculate the final length of the sleeves in advance to properly place them. I ran the running stitch so the frill would create a wedge shape, narrow at the top and the full width at the bottom. The cuff frills are one of my favorite features.

I was so scared about setting in the sleeves. The Tuxedo Jacket of Doom has scarred me for life. As I was cutting, I realized that I had forgotten to alter the pattern for a broad back. As a quick and dirty fix, I swung out the armscye of the side back about an inch and then tapered back into the side seam. With this additional length in the armscye, the sleevecap needed no easing. It went in like a dream. Since Kathleen Fasanella asserts that sleeve cap ease is bogus and I have noticed no mobility problems (I mean, it's a coat--I'm not going to be doing yoga in it), I may do this in the future for coats.

Inner Cuff Over Lining and Interlining One of the big places where coats fail me, I find, is where the wind whips in through the sleeve opening. This is especially a problem on a bike, where your hands are positioned for maximum exposure of the opening to the whoosh of oncoming wind. I have been biking a lot this winter using my Capital Bikeshare membership. As an aside, I LOVE it--I did not anticipate how much I would use it. If you're in the DC area you should really consider joining. Being able to take one way trips and not having to deal with locking up my bike (not to mention I carry it up to the third floor for the season) are huge.

Inner CuffFor years I wore these gloves, which I didn't even like very much due to the blah color. But that woolly (synthetic) cuff kept my arms safe from the wind so I didn't give them up until there were holes in all the fingers. I cut off the cuff and slid it over the lining/interlining sleeve before bagging the sleeves. Once the sleeve edges were sewn, I hand tacked the woolly cuff in place at the bottom of the lining. The sleeve opening is not beautiful to look into, but it seals that opening over my wrist and no wind is coming through that sucker. I did this to a lesser extent on my purple coat just using fleece. It will be a feature in all my winter coats from now on.

I did my first successful bagging of the lower hem. It was very exciting.

Up the Stairs I used my digital camera to place the back half-belt correctly. I pinned it on, took a picture, adjusted, took a picture, etc. It was tedious but handy, as I'd been having no luck using my paper tape double.

Jumping I went to Baltimore on Friday to hang out with Cidell. Well, I told her it was to hang out. Really it was to force her to take photos! So there are a ton of them and they are great. It was even snowing. You can't plan that. We took pictures, did a little shopping (more on that later), and ate awesome pizza at Pepe's before I hit the MARC to go back home. I had been avoiding wearing the coat, not wanting to get it wrinkled, but I see that I managed to sit on the back in a wrinkly way. Oh well.

This coat took three weeks to make and I thought I'd never finish. But I wanted to get all the details right so I'd be happy with it for several years. I hate to say it, but I am kind of over my purple coat. I have been wearing it a ton this winter because it has been so unusually freaking cold, and I feel shapeless and schlumpy in it (may have to do with the weather). I didn't want that to happen with this one, though it's not warm enough to replace the purple (it's no good below freezing and really only starts to be useful a couple degrees above).

All photos are here and the pattern review is here.

47 comments:

Little Hunting Creek said...

Beautiful coat - what fabulous details. Nothing Slapdash here - you may have to change the name of your blog :)
I especially love that ruffle trim. So chic!

Lori said...

Incredible coat, it looks so fantastic on you. Your careful planning and all the details you thought of shows in the finished garment.

Eugenia said...

What a wonderful idea to put frills on a military styled coat - the masculine/feminine mix looks great! It looks so stylish and cosy! I love those fun photographs - Cidell has done an excellent job!

Marie-Christine said...

It's difficult not to feel schlumpy when you're wearing a winter coat over 2 layers of long johns :-). But you sure won't look like it AT ALL in this coat! Fabulous, and fabulous job as well.
I should recommend double-breasted for warmth though, especially on a bike, but whatever. I find your inner cuffs quite interesting. I've taken to thick knitted fingerless mittens for the same reason, and they work well for me even with shorter bracelet-length sleeves (you can wear thin gloves underneath if you need them).
Totally agree with the incredible convenience of once-in-a-while biking, no schlepping, no worrying about theft and parking.. Absolutely the way to go. Although I'm less tough than you and I've given it up for the winter :-).

Uta said...

Great coat! The combination of menswear type fabric with frills is one of my favorites. I love all the details you added to make it beautiful and practical for yourself! On the biking: I usually don't below freezing. Yesterday DD wanted to, although it was freezing, and I was so cold...

Sewlovely said...

Love the ruffled trim! Great idea to insert wrist warmers in the sleeves and fleece lined pockets. I love that.

couturearts said...

That coat was three weeks well-spent! I love the ruffle placement on the sleeves and pockets.

Sheila said...

Beautiful coat and love all the details.

montanachic said...

Really beautiful, I love hte ruffle. Coats do take FOREVER but you feel soooo wonderful when they are done.

Carol said...

Gorgeous! I've traced this same pattern off and one day I may even make it! I love your frilly trims and I adore your yellow gloves. I envy you the cool weather. This morning at 6am I got up to go for a walk on the beach and it was 25 degrees celsius (80ish in your language, I think). I don't even want to know how hot it is now.

Melissa said...

Absolutely beautiful coat! I love the ruffles too. A job well done and your time was very well spent! :-)

Our Heroine said...

(singing) Fabulous!!! The frills are so fun :)

Faye Lewis said...

I'd be thrilled with that new coat too. You did a marvelous job!

MushyWear said...

What an impressive endeavor! I love how you re-used the mitten cuffs and lined your pockets with fleece for extra warmth. Smart thinking! Overall, it's a beautiful and unique coat. Also, just wanted to say I love your new workout gear too. You did a really nice job of customizing the tops. Feeling good in what you wear while working out is so motivating!

Becky said...

Wow, the jacket looks great! The ruffle details are a very nice touch, too. And I love how many practical features you were able to incorporate into it and still have it look so stylish!

Trudy Callan said...

I love the frills! This coat is so gorgeous and looks so warm.

Venus de Hilo said...

Those cuff frills are awesomely fantastic! I don't need a coat, but now I want to put frills on something...

Barbara at Cat Fur Studio said...

The three weeks you spent making that coat were very well spent. Love the ruffles. All the elements come together perfectly. Beautiful.

Andrea said...

You did a beautiful job on this coat. I LOVE it!!!!! The added details that you added make it so unique. I never thought of adding fleece for extra warmth on the pockets. I'm going to have to keep that in mind when I finally make my coat.

Great photo shoot. I know you and Cidell had a great time.

BConky said...

Your coat is so cute, love the ruffles. You look adorable in the photo's. You look like you are having fun.

Jane M said...

What a fabulous combination of tweedy warmth and ruffly fun. Smart planning for those cozy pockets and cuffs. I love your whole ensemble....and also love that Pepe's pizza.

Cindy said...

What a fun ruffled coat! I think, we all need to make a coat at this time of year to get through the last monthes of winter...Lovely! And I love the yellow gloves with it!

Joy said...

Nice work on this! A winter coat is no small effort. I love that you lined the pockets with fleece!

Lisette M said...

Coats are a lot of work aren't they?
I love all the special details, the frill, the sleeve "thingy" to keep the draft out. We still have a lot of winter left for you to enjoy wearing it!

KID, MD said...

Wow, wow, wow!!! It is completely amazing. I love the shape, the color, the frills - everything! You did some beautiful work as well.

kbenco said...

I adore looking at winter coats when it is 42 degrees C. It is nicely chilling. Thanks. I want some yellow gloves.
Your coat is totally cute. I love the cuff frills. I am amazed that your fingers are not bleeding, I am sure there is a hole in the top of my thimble after hand sewing velvety/corduroy fabric. I also find your fleece pocket lining and bike riding sleeve adjustment very clever.

AllisonC said...

Great transformation of a pattern into something a little unusual, the ruffles are gorgeous. I really love your Burda-esque photo shoot too!

Adelaide B said...

You have been making some amazing things lately. I love this coat! The ruffles are totally cool.

Sheri said...

Love the coat & the yellow gloves. Nice job. Great details in your blog post. Thanks.

Lindsay T said...

Three weeks is not a long time at all for this coat! You did a great job on it and you look spiffy-cute.

BrusselsSprout_Katharine said...

Wow, it's beautiful, and you look great in it. Very stylish.

Noile said...

You not only made the coat, but you changed significant features, and added some cool touches all your own! I love the use of the tie silk (not, ahem, "Thai" silk!) contrast/coordinate in the sleeves and the body. It looks wonderful on you.

Cennetta said...

Outstanding! The coat is beautiful and well crafted. The buttonholes and the frills make it extra special.

Audrey said...

Wow, this coat is not only great looking, but you incorporated so many great features to make it toasty warm as well. I have definitely made notes to myself that 1. Interlining can be done with any appropriate material, 2. Line pockets with fleece so that hands will be extra warm, and 3. Use ribbing cut from sweaters, gloves or socks to prevent sleeve wind tunnels. And the gathered trim inserted in the seams, I love it. In fact in my inspiration file I have a picture of a dress with similar contrasting gathered trim inserted in sleeve and bodice seams.

-E said...

I did the out loud "Ooooooooo" when I opened up your blog. Awesome coat :)

Clio said...

Three weeks is seriously not bad for a coat. I love the frill on the sleeves!

Anonymous said...

This is wonderful - I love the frill and the fleece-lined pockets

SEWN said...

WOW!!! I love the contrast of feminine ruffles with the military look. Gorgeous coat.

gwensews said...

That is an adorable coat! Wow, it looks fantastic. So feminine.

Carolyn (cmarie12) said...

This is so stinking cute! I love the ruffled trim and how you adjusted the pattern to make it your own! What a great job you did on this!

Rosie said...

The ruffles (and color thereof) makes your coat all you! Great job!

ELMO said...

Love the idea of the fleece pockets, I have some scraps I don't know what to do with. Great coat!!

Vicki said...

Congratulations! Fabulous coat. Fun photos too.

senaSews said...

I love the combination of masculine fabric with the ruffle details. Great, great coat! And nice pictures, too!

McVal said...

Brilliant idea to line the pockets with fleece! It turned out great!

Isabelle said...

Great pictures! What a fun coat.

Patricia said...

Beautiful work! What a trouper you were to hand gather the ruffle! I have found that sewing a wide zigzag over a string or size 10 crochet cotton thread works well to gather heavy fabrics. Just put a big knot in the end before you start sewing, and when finished zigzagging, pull both ends of the string to gather. The string can easily be pulled out after the ruffle is sewn to the garment, but it often doesn't hurt to leave it in.