Thursday, June 16, 2011

Burda 12-2010-105, Shoulder Princess Tee

Burda 12-2010-105 Thumbnail

I really liked the shoulder princess top in Burda 12-2010-105. The princess seams and interesting panel lines, along with the little neck ruffle, looked really fantastic with the French seams (or maybe they're flat felled) and semi-transparent fabric.

I should start by saying that this is not the most helpful review of the pattern. It's meant to be made of "stretch cotton tulle" or stretch satin. I made it in a knit, eliminated the interesting panel seams, tucked the front ruffle down, widened the shoulder for more coverage and left off the sleeve, and lengthened it by four inches. It doesn't really resemble the original at this point!

It was easy to eliminate the panel seams as the pattern is drafted in a regular princess style with full length front, side front, back, and side back pieces and the panel seams are just marked on the pieces. This made it easy to trace for my purposes.

Picot Elastic Details I found some olive green picot elastic at one of the little trim and elastic shops in Montreal during PR Weekend and had to get some. It's a color I sew in often enough that I was bound to make something it would go with eventually! As with my hot pink top with black lace trim (which pilled on the first wearing, grr), I was just so over making solid-colored items that I had to add a little something.

I had originally intended to have the little front neckline gather stand up as a ruffle as in the original pattern, but I had not thought to finish the edge of the fabric first (I would recommend a serger rolled hem or a close zigzag rather than turning under), and I didn't really like the way it was looking in my floppy jersey. So I turned under the neckline all the way around and finished it with the elastic. I had to hand baste the elastic on to get it to sit properly so the picot edge would just peek out.

Back

Aside from a little pressing divot that I apparently wasn't able to press out at center back, the back view on this works. I did swayback correction by taking a wedge out of the center back piece and taking it in along the center back/side back seam as for darts.

Shirt-tail Hem

Although I lengthened this top 4 inches--the original is only slightly longer than waist length; I am well past the age of belly-showing--I kept the shirttail hem. In the end, I don't think it works for this particular project. The jersey is really floppy with no body and it really doesn't sit well if not tucked in. The fabric does nothing for a non-flat stomach and just kind of flops over the hips, and you can see all the lumps and bumps of the skirt's waistband (and what's underneath the waistband, ahem) through the fabric. I was fairly disappointed in that, as I love the color. I may go back and put in a slightly shorter, straight hem and see if that improves wearability.

All photos are here and the pattern review is here.

18 comments:

Jemajo said...

Beautiful fit on you!
I have to admit that I haven't seen a princess seamed teeshirt before. The shaping is really lovely.
Well done!

KID, MD said...

This is genius! I love that pattern, but couldn't think of any way it would fit in my lifestyle - as a tee shirt, of course!! Genius, I say. Love the picot trim as well. Very cute touch.

molly said...

I like you version better, the one in the magazine was not appealing to me at all.

Adelaide B said...

Using the picot elastic is a great way to finish the arms and neck holes. I am somewhat uninspired when finishing knits. (Probably because I have yet to learn to properly sew them)

Lynn said...

Great outfit!

Uta said...

I'd never have thought to use that pattern, and it looks so good! Thanks for the show and tell.

Karin said...

How annoying that you can only tuck it in. I find it difficult to know how different knits will turn out until I have actually sewn them up. That said, I like the way you turned a crazy pattern into something wearable and useful. A princess seamed tshirt looks fresh and new.

kbenco said...

I keep looking at that pattern, then telling myself sternly that I would not wear it, but you have just rescued it for me. A t shirt version, Of course! Did I mention that you are brilliant and that the t shirt looks terrific?

Faye Lewis said...

That's a nice knit tee variation. Love a great tee.

Mrs. Micawber said...

Why is it so hard to find nice knits that are stretchy AND stable, with good body? And that don't pill right away. Grrr indeed.

That said, yours looks great.

Shannon said...

I think it's great the way you took that interesting pattern designed for wovens and turned it into a t-shirt. Now that you've made this one, I think it would be worth trying it again!

HeathersSphere said...

One look, and wow, a cool looking top! I like the "tucked in" look on you. Anything looks fine on your svelte figure!

Big in Japan said...

I'm in the camp that would never have given the pattern a second thought, but your version I like, especially as action-wear. It's more sassy than a plain t-shirt, but very suitable for cycling in a skirt.

Trudy Callan said...

Totally adorable. So much better than a plain tee

A Sewn Wardrobe said...

I love the color too. Olive is so sophisticated IMHO.

I'm shocked that you could see past the crazy of this pattern to make it into such a cute top. To me, that line drawing looks scary weird.

MushyWear said...

I think this whole look is awesome. I hope I have the skirt pattern. I'm going to have to check! Even though the top didn't work out as you had planned due to the fabric, it is pretty cute as a stylish alternative to a plain t-shirt, and I think it looks great tucked in.

McVal said...

Very cute! You are amazing with knits!

Cennetta said...

This is a very good post on redesigning a pattern to fit your own personal taste. The design gives a new spin on summer t-shirts. I like the change. You've got me thinking about doing the same. Thanks for the inspiration and encouragement.