Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Silk Georgette Pleated Dirndl Skirt


Pleated Dirndl Thumbnail

When I made my Burda 09-2010-111 wrap blouse out of silk georgette in my favorite shade of olive (from G Street's $7.97/yd silk novelty table; with discount and coupon I paid $5/yd) I managed to lay out the fabric to be able to make a skirt as well.








I am very drawn to the ballerina style skirt, as shown by my Pinterest picks!  While I don't know that I could go full-on tutu like the look on the right (at least for daytime/work), I could at least take advantage the airy properties of my silk georgette to get a little of the same feel.




Pleats Pinned


I just used simple rectangles for this self-drafted skirt:  two for the skirt, French-seamed together, and one for the waistband, heavily interfaced.

A traditional dirndl skirt is gathered, but I wanted a touch more sophistication so I pleated the fabric instead.  I didn't measure, just eyeballed and pinned out the pleats, using the waistband for the length.

I admit I had to pin them a couple times to get the fabric evenly distributed, so depending on your personality you might prefer marking.
Lining

For the lining, I cut an A-line with a wide hem (almost a half circle skirt) and pleated the waistline of the lining as well, taking larger and fewer pleats.

As per my usual procedure, I first stitched the waistband to the wrong side of the fabric, sandwiching the lining between the fashion fabric and the waistband.  Then I flipped the waistband to the front and topstitched.  That way, I don't have to worry about catching the underside of the waistband in my topstitch.


Zipper with French Seam
Invisible Zip























I always prefer to French seam silk, but a zipper creates a dilemma.

First, I interfaced it for stability and inserted an invisible zipper.

Then I French seamed from an inch or so below the zipper to the hem.  I wish I had a better description for the next step, but I don't.  You just kind of wing it to finish that last inch below the zipper.  It only works in a lightweight silk, but you can see from the outer photo of the zipper that it doesn't look too bad at the bottom.


Rolled Hem
I used my rolled hem foot to finish the hem of the skirt.  I love the rolled hem foot, though it is a bit tricky to use.  The trickiest part of a rolled hem is going over seams.  So here, I didn't.  I hemmed the two pieces of the skirt before seaming them together.  Then, when sewing the pieces together, you have to start your side seam from the hem edge to get them to line up.  This only works if you know exactly how long your want your finished garment.



BackSide

When I finished this skirt I realized it was my third olive green silk skirt!  I previously made Burda 01-2008-127 and one of Burda 09-2007-116 which I apparently never blogged but is made out of the leftover fabric from this project.

However, it's my only *bikeable* olive green silk skirt, so it's a justifiable wardrobe addition.  `-)

All photos are here and the pattern review is here.

33 comments:

Mary said...

Hi Trena, You look teeny and adorable in this skirt. I have skirt obsession lately and am currently making a flare skirt in goldenrod (poly shantung from a thrift store). I love the whole outfit.

Gypsy Love said...

I love it! so light and airy!

badmomgoodmom said...

Super cute skirt and resourceful to cut your blouse to leave enough fabric leftover for the skirt.

Karin said...

Olive is classic and neutral, so I think multiple olive skirts is easily justified. This is such a cute, wearable skirt. I find it very inspiring. It shows how good simple shapes and traditional designs can be!

Peter Lappin said...

Lovely, and a beautiful color!

Donna said...

Beautiful - I think it really suits you! And I love how you've styled it. :)

Adelaide B said...

OOOOOOO. I like this one. The pleats give it something extra.

Rachel said...

I love it. You look great in it.

Anna Bartels said...

Love this skirt on you. You've inspired me! Agree with the other comments. You look tiny in it.

Little Hunting Creek said...

Very nice-it looks pretty on you too

Trumbelina said...

This skirt looks great! I also appreciate your description of installing the waist band. I've only ever done it the other way and stitched in the ditch. This will save me some time. Also, I like that you did pleats—definitely more sophisticated.

Uta said...

Very graceful and ballerina-like! I was thinking of a gathered skirt myself, and I must remember your waistband method, I always make such a mess of topstitching (most often childrens' waistbands, but still!).

Faye Lewis said...

Sort of wish I were a little bitty like you. Every thing looks soooo good on you.

Dressed2atee said...

Great skirt!

CGCouture said...

I am not generally a fan of this color, however it looks smashing on you! Cute skirt! And isn't it fun when you find you can get two garments out of fabric you only planned to get one from? I always love getting little freebies like that. :-)

Amanda S. said...

Okay, girl this is YOUR silhouette! So very flattering and makes your waist look teeny tiny. You need more!!!

Kyle said...

The pleating gtotally makes it. Great job--looks fab on you!!

Mrs. Micawber said...

I love skirts like this! I've made several over my lifetime, all self-drafted like yours. It's so satisfying.

That fabric is beautiful and looks so floaty.

MySummerTouch said...

I like this type of skirts on you. Your waist look skinny. I think you can cut the skirt shorter to make your legs look longer.:)

AllisonC said...

Very cute skirt and I like your waistband tip too. It still makes me smile that you make silk skirts for biking in!

Lynn said...

Look at all the beautiful detail! You are going to have to get rid of that Slapdash label one of these days.

LinB said...

Excellent job! I agree that pleats are a better width-control strategy for anyone over the age of 15. Never apologize to yourself for having multiple garments in the same color! They are all at least slightly different, yes? You won't wear them all at the same time, will you? As a teenager, I had 5 green dresses made from the same pattern in my closet. They were all different shades of green, some prints, some solids, some long, some short. I loved and wore them all to rags. I still have that pattern ... am now about 40 years too old to pull it off, but am saving it for Possible Future Granddaughters.

Lisette M said...

Super cute! Very flattering on you!

DanaJ said...

super cute on you....with the short boots.

and the drapey long sleeve blouse is good looking too, would look good with slender line jeans or pants. Know you don't like pants!

kbenco said...

Gosh that is so pretty. What an excellent skirt.

McVal said...

S.weet! On both!
I'm working on my daughter's prom dress and was wondering how to fit the french seam of the sheer overlay into the zipper... Thanks for the idea on how to wrangle it!
Gotta look up that Burda top. Really nice!

Nancy K said...

You have the perfect figure for this very stylish skirt. (See yesterdays NY Times Style section ) It makes your waist look tiny. Gorgeous.

Noile said...

What an adorable little skirt -- I especially like it with the leotard-like top. Too cute!

velosewer said...

This is really pretty. The pleats are soft and sit so well on you. Love it and the colour.

window dressing said...

I love the colour and fabric. Looks very good on you.

Elizabeth said...

Love the drape on this skirt! I sure wish I could wear that style of skirt. It looks wonderful on you :)

Lisa said...

Another winner Trena. You really suit this colour.


I have nominated you for a Sunshine blogger award . See here

http://creativecraftwork.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/sunshine-all-around.html

gwensews said...

I really like the "out blouse" version. It's a great style on you.